Potential tropical system may flood Florida

Potential tropical system may flood Florida


Ian caused so much hardship for so many and even more than a month later, flooding is still an issue, especially along the St. Johns River.A major rain event in the forecast is unwelcome news for those living by Lake Monroe where the situation has improved but is still fragile.Related: What to know about the tropical disturbance that could impact Florida“There’s so many people who are still dealing with this. We meet them and talk to them every day,” Nancy Hurley said. More than a month later, things are better along Lake Jesup. Homes surrounded by flooding a month ago still have water, but it has receded some. It’s still up to the front of many homes that face the lake.”It’s really slow going out, and there’s still a foot of water under the house,” Hurley said. The Hurleys raised their house 10 feet after the flooding from Hurricane Irma five years ago, so now they’re above the floodwaters, but they are still something to contend with. Many still have issues.Related: Tropical disturbance to bring rough weather to hurricane-torn Central Florida coasts”We have 30 roads that still have water on them and 80 houses that have water inside of them, so while a lot of people are in recovery mode, some are still in response,” Seminole County emergency manager Alan Harris said. With the potential of a tropical system early next week, Harris said the latest forecast suggests waters may rise an inch and a half to two inches.”So that would bring additional water to an area where the ground is already saturated and doesn’t need additional water,” Harris said. Christine Mundy with St. Johns River Water Management said the impacts will depend on where the system goes.”Whether it stays coastal, whether the inland rainfall is spotty or if it’s more widespread rainfall,” Mundy said.Areas along the St. Johns River still have anywhere from minor to moderate flooding. Significant wind from the north will slow the floodwaters’ retreat.”It would slow down more drainage in the Central Florida area,” Mundy said.And for people like Hurley who are still dealing with high water, the storm impacts could upend much of the progress made after Ian.“It’ll set us back. And it’s already been a month, so it’s very disappointing and I hope it blows another way,” Hurley said.

Ian caused so much hardship for so many and even more than a month later, flooding is still an issue, especially along the St. Johns River.

A major rain event in the forecast is unwelcome news for those living by Lake Monroe where the situation has improved but is still fragile.

Related: What to know about the tropical disturbance that could impact Florida

“There’s so many people who are still dealing with this. We meet them and talk to them every day,” Nancy Hurley said.

More than a month later, things are better along Lake Jesup. Homes surrounded by flooding a month ago still have water, but it has receded some. It’s still up to the front of many homes that face the lake.

“It’s really slow going out, and there’s still a foot of water under the house,” Hurley said.

The Hurleys raised their house 10 feet after the flooding from Hurricane Irma five years ago, so now they’re above the floodwaters, but they are still something to contend with. Many still have issues.

Related: Tropical disturbance to bring rough weather to hurricane-torn Central Florida coasts

“We have 30 roads that still have water on them and 80 houses that have water inside of them, so while a lot of people are in recovery mode, some are still in response,” Seminole County emergency manager Alan Harris said.

With the potential of a tropical system early next week, Harris said the latest forecast suggests waters may rise an inch and a half to two inches.

“So that would bring additional water to an area where the ground is already saturated and doesn’t need additional water,” Harris said.

Christine Mundy with St. Johns River Water Management said the impacts will depend on where the system goes.

“Whether it stays coastal, whether the inland rainfall is spotty or if it’s more widespread rainfall,” Mundy said.

Areas along the St. Johns River still have anywhere from minor to moderate flooding. Significant wind from the north will slow the floodwaters’ retreat.

“It would slow down more drainage in the Central Florida area,” Mundy said.

And for people like Hurley who are still dealing with high water, the storm impacts could upend much of the progress made after Ian.

“It’ll set us back. And it’s already been a month, so it’s very disappointing and I hope it blows another way,” Hurley said.



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